As a landlord, can you be held liable for the actions of your tenants?

  • Talk to tenants — In many cases, your tenants may just be oblivious to the fact that they are causing a disturbance. They may not realize they’re being too loud, or to them it’s normal. In these situations, a firm but friendly warning can make everything right.
  • Inform them in writing — a reminder sent online via a letter in the mail is evidence that you attempted to solve the problem. If you do end up in court (heaven forbid), you will have hard evidence that you did not ignore the problem. Do not underestimate the risk of being sued. It is not unheard of for landlords to have to pay damages in the mid to high 5 figures. It might even be safe to say that these occurrences are on the rise!
  • Termination of the tenancy agreement — if a nuisance tenant just does not want to change their ways, even if they always pay their rent on time and in full, you can (and probably should) evict them. This is a last resort, and you should obviously only evict a tenant if you absolutely need to. You will need to have plenty of evidence that the tenant disturbs the peace, such such as police reports from neighbors and police officers’ notes from their interventions.

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We're a team of people trying to make real estate ownership, rental, and investment accessible to everyone.